“the princess who thought she was made of glass”

glass princess

My recent historical dive obsession this week has been Princess Alexandra of Bavaria who suffered from the “glass delusion,” a delusion in which the suffer thought they were in some way composed of glass.

At some point in young adulthood, she became convinced that she had swallowed a glass piano as a child. BBC – Culture did a write up last week about the historical context and mentioned the stage play I will soon see based on Princess Alexandra.

From BBC – Culture:

The glass delusion was well-known enough to crop up briefly in Robert Burton’s The Anatomy of Melancholy in 1612, in a long passage of paranoid anxieties: “Fear of devils, death, that they shall be so sick, of some such or such disease, ready to tremble at every object… that they are all glass, and therefore will suffer no man to come near them.”

 

 

*THIS POST INCLUDES AN AFFILIATED LINK TO SUPPORT GOOD WRITING.

“An absence of presence: domestic records”

Familiars-young-woman-750

I found this brisk article at Historia, which is the online magazine for The Historical Writers’ Association. My interest comes because I recently read The Familiars by Stacey Halls and am always curious to hear more from writers themselves. I was very disappointed to cancel my tickets for a Waterstones event in February headlined by Hall as I had a dreadful migraine, but at least reading this piece gave me a small view in to what sparked her interest for this time period in England, witches and women’s lives.

An absence of presence: domestic records by Stacey Halls, 6/2/2019 at Historia

Familiar things, like household accounts, can be the only traces that can lead us to the everyday lives of women in previous centuries. For author Stacey Halls, domestic records painted a detailed picture of 17th century life.

 

“Being Buried Alive Was So Common in the Victorian Era That Doctors Used these 10 Methods to Prevent It”

Wiertz_burial

A bit of light fare looking at common Victorian era quackery used to prevent being buried alive. The author of this piece also mentions Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and other short nods to Gothic interests over at History Collection.